Discussion:
Is This The End of The Road For Venezuela? | Frontera News
(demasiado antiguo para responder)
jat
2017-06-18 17:02:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Rising default risk

Investors in Venezuelan debt (EMB) are undeterred by the rising
probability of a default by this embattled country. Emerging market fund
managers are increasingly attracted to the high yields associated with
Venezuela’s high-risk bonds. Some experts, however, still believe that
Venezuela’s default is coming soon. The nation recently defaulted on its
$2.5 billion loan from Russia’s oil company Rosneft.

Recently, Kevin Daly, an emerging market debt specialist at Aberdeen
Asset Management, told the Financial Times that Venezuela’s default is
inevitable. “But amid mounting expectation that future defaults are
inevitable as the crisis-ridden country’s coffers run dry and protests
against the increasingly authoritarian government mount, some investors
now believe the strongest returns may come from longer-term paper.” He
continued, “The backdrop suggests we are moving closer to a credit
event. The government is becoming more dysfunctional, the protests are
becoming more fevered and it does feel like there could be splits in the
government and military.”

Falling oil prices since 2014 and mismanagement of the economy have led
to triple digit inflation in the troubled country and depleted its
foreign reserves.

https://fronteranews.com/news/latam/3-is-this-the-end-of-the-road-for-venezuela/
--
/jat
Knowledge will set you free
El conocimiento te hará libre
PL
2017-06-18 18:12:41 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
No it isn't. In fact it a a new start to recover from the Chavista
disaster. Another nail in the coffin of one of the dictatorships you
have supported for so long, JAT.
Note that higher interest requirements means falling prices for existing
bonds.

On 6/18/2017 7:02 PM, jat wrote:
Part of the story as usual.

Is This The End of The Road For Venezuela?
By Ridhi Khaitan -
15 Jun 2017

Rising default risk

Investors in Venezuelan debt (EMB) are undeterred by the rising
probability of a default by this embattled country. Emerging market fund
managers are increasingly attracted to the high yields associated with
Venezuela's high-risk bonds. Some experts, however, still believe that
Venezuela's default is coming soon. The nation recently defaulted on its
$2.5 billion loan from Russia's oil company Rosneft.

Recently, Kevin Daly, an emerging market debt specialist at Aberdeen
Asset Management, told the Financial Times that Venezuela's default is
inevitable. "But amid mounting expectation that future defaults are
inevitable as the crisis-ridden country's coffers run dry and protests
against the increasingly authoritarian government mount, some investors
now believe the strongest returns may come from longer-term paper." He
continued, "The backdrop suggests we are moving closer to a credit
event. The government is becoming more dysfunctional, the protests are
becoming more fevered and it does feel like there could be splits in the
government and military."

Falling oil prices since 2014 and mismanagement of the economy have led
to triple digit inflation in the troubled country and depleted its
foreign reserves.
Related Article 3 Reasons Why Venezuela May Not Default On Its Debt
Payments

Since 2013, the economy has decelerated by 27% and the IMF predicts
inflation to touch 720% this year. To further add to investor woes, the
country's central bank has stopped publishing economic indicators such
as GDP, balance of payments etc.

The country is now facing a shortage of basic necessities including food
and medicines. Venezuela's unpopular government led by Nicolas Maduro
has become even more dependent on financial deals and sale of assets to
boost its foreign exchange reserves. The Maduro government has slashed
imports of basic necessities for years to meet its bond commitments
which has spurred shortages.

Economic experts believe the only way out for Venezuela is to scrap its
price and currency control mechanisms that have crippled the private
sector. Venezuela's bonds are currently the highest-yielding among all
emerging market securities due to the high default risk attached to them.

https://fronteranews.com/news/latam/3-is-this-the-end-of-the-road-for-venezuela/
jat
2017-06-19 05:00:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I haven't supported any politician. I don't need that. Maybe you do...
Stop eating shit, YMF

/jat
Knowledge will set you free
El conocimiento te hará libre
Post by PL
No it isn't. In fact it a a new start to recover from the Chavista
disaster. Another nail in the coffin of one of the dictatorships you
have supported for so long, JAT.
Note that higher interest requirements means falling prices for existing
bonds.
Part of the story as usual.
Is This The End of The Road For Venezuela?
By Ridhi Khaitan -
15 Jun 2017
Rising default risk
Investors in Venezuelan debt (EMB) are undeterred by the rising
probability of a default by this embattled country. Emerging market fund
managers are increasingly attracted to the high yields associated with
Venezuela's high-risk bonds. Some experts, however, still believe that
Venezuela's default is coming soon. The nation recently defaulted on its
$2.5 billion loan from Russia's oil company Rosneft.
Recently, Kevin Daly, an emerging market debt specialist at Aberdeen
Asset Management, told the Financial Times that Venezuela's default is
inevitable. "But amid mounting expectation that future defaults are
inevitable as the crisis-ridden country's coffers run dry and protests
against the increasingly authoritarian government mount, some investors
now believe the strongest returns may come from longer-term paper." He
continued, "The backdrop suggests we are moving closer to a credit
event. The government is becoming more dysfunctional, the protests are
becoming more fevered and it does feel like there could be splits in the
government and military."
Falling oil prices since 2014 and mismanagement of the economy have led
to triple digit inflation in the troubled country and depleted its
foreign reserves.
Related Article 3 Reasons Why Venezuela May Not Default On Its Debt
Payments
Since 2013, the economy has decelerated by 27% and the IMF predicts
inflation to touch 720% this year. To further add to investor woes, the
country's central bank has stopped publishing economic indicators such
as GDP, balance of payments etc.
The country is now facing a shortage of basic necessities including food
and medicines. Venezuela's unpopular government led by Nicolas Maduro
has become even more dependent on financial deals and sale of assets to
boost its foreign exchange reserves. The Maduro government has slashed
imports of basic necessities for years to meet its bond commitments
which has spurred shortages.
Economic experts believe the only way out for Venezuela is to scrap its
price and currency control mechanisms that have crippled the private
sector. Venezuela's bonds are currently the highest-yielding among all
emerging market securities due to the high default risk attached to them.
https://fronteranews.com/news/latam/3-is-this-the-end-of-the-road-for-venezuela/
PL
2017-06-19 11:49:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by jat
I haven't supported any politician.
Lots of your messages in support of Chavez and Castro expose you (again)
as the liar you are.
Internet has a long memory, JAT.
Face facts and get a life.
Post by jat
Post by PL
No it isn't. In fact it a a new start to recover from the Chavista
disaster. Another nail in the coffin of one of the dictatorships you
have supported for so long, JAT.
Note that higher interest requirements means falling prices for existing
bonds.
Part of the story as usual.
Is This The End of The Road For Venezuela?
By Ridhi Khaitan -
15 Jun 2017
Rising default risk
Investors in Venezuelan debt (EMB) are undeterred by the rising
probability of a default by this embattled country. Emerging market fund
managers are increasingly attracted to the high yields associated with
Venezuela's high-risk bonds. Some experts, however, still believe that
Venezuela's default is coming soon. The nation recently defaulted on its
$2.5 billion loan from Russia's oil company Rosneft.
Recently, Kevin Daly, an emerging market debt specialist at Aberdeen
Asset Management, told the Financial Times that Venezuela's default is
inevitable. "But amid mounting expectation that future defaults are
inevitable as the crisis-ridden country's coffers run dry and protests
against the increasingly authoritarian government mount, some investors
now believe the strongest returns may come from longer-term paper." He
continued, "The backdrop suggests we are moving closer to a credit
event. The government is becoming more dysfunctional, the protests are
becoming more fevered and it does feel like there could be splits in the
government and military."
Falling oil prices since 2014 and mismanagement of the economy have led
to triple digit inflation in the troubled country and depleted its
foreign reserves.
Related Article 3 Reasons Why Venezuela May Not Default On Its Debt
Payments
Since 2013, the economy has decelerated by 27% and the IMF predicts
inflation to touch 720% this year. To further add to investor woes, the
country's central bank has stopped publishing economic indicators such
as GDP, balance of payments etc.
The country is now facing a shortage of basic necessities including food
and medicines. Venezuela's unpopular government led by Nicolas Maduro
has become even more dependent on financial deals and sale of assets to
boost its foreign exchange reserves. The Maduro government has slashed
imports of basic necessities for years to meet its bond commitments
which has spurred shortages.
Economic experts believe the only way out for Venezuela is to scrap its
price and currency control mechanisms that have crippled the private
sector. Venezuela's bonds are currently the highest-yielding among all
emerging market securities due to the high default risk attached to them.
https://fronteranews.com/news/latam/3-is-this-the-end-of-the-road-for-venezuela/
jat
2017-06-19 15:20:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
You get a life as well. I got one already...
Sure, Internet has a long memory. And, it is also very comprehensive.
Those messages are to make fun of you. Just because *you're so
ridiculous* - What those messages really expose is how idiot and naive
you are, supporting politicians. Do you eat shit or suck your thumb?

If you don't like my postings just don't read them, don't follow them.
As you can see I don't follow yours.

/jat
Knowledge will set you free
El conocimiento te hará libre
Post by PL
Post by jat
I haven't supported any politician.
Lots of your messages in support of Chavez and Castro expose you (again)
as the liar you are.
Internet has a long memory, JAT.
Face facts and get a life.
Post by jat
Post by PL
No it isn't. In fact it a a new start to recover from the Chavista
disaster. Another nail in the coffin of one of the dictatorships you
have supported for so long, JAT.
Note that higher interest requirements means falling prices for existing
bonds.
Part of the story as usual.
Is This The End of The Road For Venezuela?
By Ridhi Khaitan -
15 Jun 2017
Rising default risk
Investors in Venezuelan debt (EMB) are undeterred by the rising
probability of a default by this embattled country. Emerging market fund
managers are increasingly attracted to the high yields associated with
Venezuela's high-risk bonds. Some experts, however, still believe that
Venezuela's default is coming soon. The nation recently defaulted on its
$2.5 billion loan from Russia's oil company Rosneft.
Recently, Kevin Daly, an emerging market debt specialist at Aberdeen
Asset Management, told the Financial Times that Venezuela's default is
inevitable. "But amid mounting expectation that future defaults are
inevitable as the crisis-ridden country's coffers run dry and protests
against the increasingly authoritarian government mount, some investors
now believe the strongest returns may come from longer-term paper." He
continued, "The backdrop suggests we are moving closer to a credit
event. The government is becoming more dysfunctional, the protests are
becoming more fevered and it does feel like there could be splits in the
government and military."
Falling oil prices since 2014 and mismanagement of the economy have led
to triple digit inflation in the troubled country and depleted its
foreign reserves.
Related Article 3 Reasons Why Venezuela May Not Default On Its Debt
Payments
Since 2013, the economy has decelerated by 27% and the IMF predicts
inflation to touch 720% this year. To further add to investor woes, the
country's central bank has stopped publishing economic indicators such
as GDP, balance of payments etc.
The country is now facing a shortage of basic necessities including food
and medicines. Venezuela's unpopular government led by Nicolas Maduro
has become even more dependent on financial deals and sale of assets to
boost its foreign exchange reserves. The Maduro government has slashed
imports of basic necessities for years to meet its bond commitments
which has spurred shortages.
Economic experts believe the only way out for Venezuela is to scrap its
price and currency control mechanisms that have crippled the private
sector. Venezuela's bonds are currently the highest-yielding among all
emerging market securities due to the high default risk attached to them.
https://fronteranews.com/news/latam/3-is-this-the-end-of-the-road-for-venezuela/
PL
2017-06-19 19:56:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by jat
You get a life as well.
I have a life and having fun
Post by jat
Sure, Internet has a long memory. And, it is also very comprehensive.
and it exposes your lies. just remember that
MDR
Post by jat
Post by PL
Post by jat
I haven't supported any politician.
Lots of your messages in support of Chavez and Castro expose you (again)
as the liar you are.
Internet has a long memory, JAT.
Face facts and get a life.
Post by jat
Post by PL
No it isn't. In fact it a a new start to recover from the Chavista
disaster. Another nail in the coffin of one of the dictatorships you
have supported for so long, JAT.
Note that higher interest requirements means falling prices for existing
bonds.
Part of the story as usual.
Is This The End of The Road For Venezuela?
By Ridhi Khaitan -
15 Jun 2017
Rising default risk
Investors in Venezuelan debt (EMB) are undeterred by the rising
probability of a default by this embattled country. Emerging market fund
managers are increasingly attracted to the high yields associated with
Venezuela's high-risk bonds. Some experts, however, still believe that
Venezuela's default is coming soon. The nation recently defaulted on its
$2.5 billion loan from Russia's oil company Rosneft.
Recently, Kevin Daly, an emerging market debt specialist at Aberdeen
Asset Management, told the Financial Times that Venezuela's default is
inevitable. "But amid mounting expectation that future defaults are
inevitable as the crisis-ridden country's coffers run dry and protests
against the increasingly authoritarian government mount, some investors
now believe the strongest returns may come from longer-term paper." He
continued, "The backdrop suggests we are moving closer to a credit
event. The government is becoming more dysfunctional, the protests are
becoming more fevered and it does feel like there could be splits in the
government and military."
Falling oil prices since 2014 and mismanagement of the economy have led
to triple digit inflation in the troubled country and depleted its
foreign reserves.
Related Article 3 Reasons Why Venezuela May Not Default On Its Debt
Payments
Since 2013, the economy has decelerated by 27% and the IMF predicts
inflation to touch 720% this year. To further add to investor woes, the
country's central bank has stopped publishing economic indicators such
as GDP, balance of payments etc.
The country is now facing a shortage of basic necessities including food
and medicines. Venezuela's unpopular government led by Nicolas Maduro
has become even more dependent on financial deals and sale of assets to
boost its foreign exchange reserves. The Maduro government has slashed
imports of basic necessities for years to meet its bond commitments
which has spurred shortages.
Economic experts believe the only way out for Venezuela is to scrap its
price and currency control mechanisms that have crippled the private
sector. Venezuela's bonds are currently the highest-yielding among all
emerging market securities due to the high default risk attached to them.
https://fronteranews.com/news/latam/3-is-this-the-end-of-the-road-for-venezuela/
jat
2017-06-19 22:30:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Whatever you say nobody cares, YMF

/jat
Knowledge will set you free
El conocimiento te hará libre
Post by PL
Post by jat
You get a life as well.
I have a life and having fun
Post by jat
Sure, Internet has a long memory. And, it is also very comprehensive.
and it exposes your lies. just remember that
MDR
Post by jat
Post by PL
Post by jat
I haven't supported any politician.
Lots of your messages in support of Chavez and Castro expose you (again)
as the liar you are.
Internet has a long memory, JAT.
Face facts and get a life.
Post by jat
Post by PL
No it isn't. In fact it a a new start to recover from the Chavista
disaster. Another nail in the coffin of one of the dictatorships you
have supported for so long, JAT.
Note that higher interest requirements means falling prices for existing
bonds.
Part of the story as usual.
Is This The End of The Road For Venezuela?
By Ridhi Khaitan -
15 Jun 2017
Rising default risk
Investors in Venezuelan debt (EMB) are undeterred by the rising
probability of a default by this embattled country. Emerging market fund
managers are increasingly attracted to the high yields associated with
Venezuela's high-risk bonds. Some experts, however, still believe that
Venezuela's default is coming soon. The nation recently defaulted on its
$2.5 billion loan from Russia's oil company Rosneft.
Recently, Kevin Daly, an emerging market debt specialist at Aberdeen
Asset Management, told the Financial Times that Venezuela's default is
inevitable. "But amid mounting expectation that future defaults are
inevitable as the crisis-ridden country's coffers run dry and protests
against the increasingly authoritarian government mount, some investors
now believe the strongest returns may come from longer-term paper." He
continued, "The backdrop suggests we are moving closer to a credit
event. The government is becoming more dysfunctional, the protests are
becoming more fevered and it does feel like there could be splits in the
government and military."
Falling oil prices since 2014 and mismanagement of the economy have led
to triple digit inflation in the troubled country and depleted its
foreign reserves.
Related Article 3 Reasons Why Venezuela May Not Default On Its Debt
Payments
Since 2013, the economy has decelerated by 27% and the IMF predicts
inflation to touch 720% this year. To further add to investor woes, the
country's central bank has stopped publishing economic indicators such
as GDP, balance of payments etc.
The country is now facing a shortage of basic necessities including food
and medicines. Venezuela's unpopular government led by Nicolas Maduro
has become even more dependent on financial deals and sale of assets to
boost its foreign exchange reserves. The Maduro government has slashed
imports of basic necessities for years to meet its bond commitments
which has spurred shortages.
Economic experts believe the only way out for Venezuela is to scrap its
price and currency control mechanisms that have crippled the private
sector. Venezuela's bonds are currently the highest-yielding among all
emerging market securities due to the high default risk attached to them.
https://fronteranews.com/news/latam/3-is-this-the-end-of-the-road-for-venezuela/
PL
2017-06-20 12:49:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by jat
Whatever you say nobody cares
You care, idiot.
As always your acts show your words are lies.
You are so entertaining.
MDR
Post by jat
Post by PL
Post by jat
You get a life as well.
I have a life and having fun
Post by jat
Sure, Internet has a long memory. And, it is also very comprehensive.
and it exposes your lies. just remember that
MDR
Post by jat
Post by PL
Post by jat
I haven't supported any politician.
Lots of your messages in support of Chavez and Castro expose you (again)
as the liar you are.
Internet has a long memory, JAT.
Face facts and get a life.
Post by jat
Post by PL
No it isn't. In fact it a a new start to recover from the Chavista
disaster. Another nail in the coffin of one of the dictatorships you
have supported for so long, JAT.
Note that higher interest requirements means falling prices for existing
bonds.
Part of the story as usual.
Is This The End of The Road For Venezuela?
By Ridhi Khaitan -
15 Jun 2017
Rising default risk
Investors in Venezuelan debt (EMB) are undeterred by the rising
probability of a default by this embattled country. Emerging market fund
managers are increasingly attracted to the high yields associated with
Venezuela's high-risk bonds. Some experts, however, still believe that
Venezuela's default is coming soon. The nation recently defaulted on its
$2.5 billion loan from Russia's oil company Rosneft.
Recently, Kevin Daly, an emerging market debt specialist at Aberdeen
Asset Management, told the Financial Times that Venezuela's default is
inevitable. "But amid mounting expectation that future defaults are
inevitable as the crisis-ridden country's coffers run dry and protests
against the increasingly authoritarian government mount, some investors
now believe the strongest returns may come from longer-term paper." He
continued, "The backdrop suggests we are moving closer to a credit
event. The government is becoming more dysfunctional, the protests are
becoming more fevered and it does feel like there could be splits in the
government and military."
Falling oil prices since 2014 and mismanagement of the economy have led
to triple digit inflation in the troubled country and depleted its
foreign reserves.
Related Article 3 Reasons Why Venezuela May Not Default On Its Debt
Payments
Since 2013, the economy has decelerated by 27% and the IMF predicts
inflation to touch 720% this year. To further add to investor woes, the
country's central bank has stopped publishing economic indicators such
as GDP, balance of payments etc.
The country is now facing a shortage of basic necessities including food
and medicines. Venezuela's unpopular government led by Nicolas Maduro
has become even more dependent on financial deals and sale of assets to
boost its foreign exchange reserves. The Maduro government has slashed
imports of basic necessities for years to meet its bond commitments
which has spurred shortages.
Economic experts believe the only way out for Venezuela is to scrap its
price and currency control mechanisms that have crippled the private
sector. Venezuela's bonds are currently the highest-yielding among all
emerging market securities due to the high default risk attached to them.
https://fronteranews.com/news/latam/3-is-this-the-end-of-the-road-for-venezuela/
jat
2017-06-20 14:49:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
So, have fun. But, don't get excited

_
/'_/)
,/_ /
/ /
/'_'/' '/'__'7,
/'/ / / /" /_\
('( ' Fuck /' ')
\ You' /
'\' _.7'
\ (
\ \
STICK IT UP THE STICKLER!


/jat
Knowledge will set you free
El conocimiento te hará libre
Post by PL
Post by jat
Whatever you say nobody cares
You care, idiot.
As always your acts show your words are lies.
You are so entertaining.
MDR
Post by jat
Post by PL
Post by jat
You get a life as well.
I have a life and having fun
Post by jat
Sure, Internet has a long memory. And, it is also very comprehensive.
and it exposes your lies. just remember that
MDR
Post by jat
Post by PL
Post by jat
I haven't supported any politician.
Lots of your messages in support of Chavez and Castro expose you (again)
as the liar you are.
Internet has a long memory, JAT.
Face facts and get a life.
Post by jat
Post by PL
No it isn't. In fact it a a new start to recover from the Chavista
disaster. Another nail in the coffin of one of the dictatorships you
have supported for so long, JAT.
Note that higher interest requirements means falling prices for existing
bonds.
Part of the story as usual.
Is This The End of The Road For Venezuela?
By Ridhi Khaitan -
15 Jun 2017
Rising default risk
Investors in Venezuelan debt (EMB) are undeterred by the rising
probability of a default by this embattled country. Emerging market fund
managers are increasingly attracted to the high yields associated with
Venezuela's high-risk bonds. Some experts, however, still believe that
Venezuela's default is coming soon. The nation recently defaulted on its
$2.5 billion loan from Russia's oil company Rosneft.
Recently, Kevin Daly, an emerging market debt specialist at Aberdeen
Asset Management, told the Financial Times that Venezuela's default is
inevitable. "But amid mounting expectation that future defaults are
inevitable as the crisis-ridden country's coffers run dry and protests
against the increasingly authoritarian government mount, some investors
now believe the strongest returns may come from longer-term paper." He
continued, "The backdrop suggests we are moving closer to a credit
event. The government is becoming more dysfunctional, the protests are
becoming more fevered and it does feel like there could be splits in the
government and military."
Falling oil prices since 2014 and mismanagement of the economy have led
to triple digit inflation in the troubled country and depleted its
foreign reserves.
Related Article 3 Reasons Why Venezuela May Not Default On Its Debt
Payments
Since 2013, the economy has decelerated by 27% and the IMF predicts
inflation to touch 720% this year. To further add to investor woes, the
country's central bank has stopped publishing economic indicators such
as GDP, balance of payments etc.
The country is now facing a shortage of basic necessities including food
and medicines. Venezuela's unpopular government led by Nicolas Maduro
has become even more dependent on financial deals and sale of assets to
boost its foreign exchange reserves. The Maduro government has slashed
imports of basic necessities for years to meet its bond commitments
which has spurred shortages.
Economic experts believe the only way out for Venezuela is to scrap its
price and currency control mechanisms that have crippled the private
sector. Venezuela's bonds are currently the highest-yielding among all
emerging market securities due to the high default risk attached to them.
https://fronteranews.com/news/latam/3-is-this-the-end-of-the-road-for-venezuela/
PL
2017-06-20 15:01:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by jat
So, have fun.
I am.
I enjoy ridiculing morons like you.
Thanks for being such an idiot.
MDR
Post by jat
_
/'_/)
,/_ /
/ /
/'_'/' '/'__'7,
/'/ / / /" /_\
('( ' Fuck /' ')
\ You' /
'\' _.7'
\ (
\ \
STICK IT UP THE STICKLER!
/jat
Knowledge will set you free
El conocimiento te hará libre
Post by PL
Post by jat
Whatever you say nobody cares
You care, idiot.
As always your acts show your words are lies.
You are so entertaining.
MDR
Post by jat
Post by PL
Post by jat
You get a life as well.
I have a life and having fun
Post by jat
Sure, Internet has a long memory. And, it is also very comprehensive.
and it exposes your lies. just remember that
MDR
Post by jat
Post by PL
Post by jat
I haven't supported any politician.
Lots of your messages in support of Chavez and Castro expose you (again)
as the liar you are.
Internet has a long memory, JAT.
Face facts and get a life.
Post by jat
Post by PL
No it isn't. In fact it a a new start to recover from the Chavista
disaster. Another nail in the coffin of one of the dictatorships you
have supported for so long, JAT.
Note that higher interest requirements means falling prices for existing
bonds.
Part of the story as usual.
Is This The End of The Road For Venezuela?
By Ridhi Khaitan -
15 Jun 2017
Rising default risk
Investors in Venezuelan debt (EMB) are undeterred by the rising
probability of a default by this embattled country. Emerging market fund
managers are increasingly attracted to the high yields associated with
Venezuela's high-risk bonds. Some experts, however, still believe that
Venezuela's default is coming soon. The nation recently defaulted on its
$2.5 billion loan from Russia's oil company Rosneft.
Recently, Kevin Daly, an emerging market debt specialist at Aberdeen
Asset Management, told the Financial Times that Venezuela's default is
inevitable. "But amid mounting expectation that future defaults are
inevitable as the crisis-ridden country's coffers run dry and protests
against the increasingly authoritarian government mount, some investors
now believe the strongest returns may come from longer-term paper." He
continued, "The backdrop suggests we are moving closer to a credit
event. The government is becoming more dysfunctional, the protests are
becoming more fevered and it does feel like there could be splits in the
government and military."
Falling oil prices since 2014 and mismanagement of the economy have led
to triple digit inflation in the troubled country and depleted its
foreign reserves.
Related Article 3 Reasons Why Venezuela May Not Default On Its Debt
Payments
Since 2013, the economy has decelerated by 27% and the IMF predicts
inflation to touch 720% this year. To further add to investor woes, the
country's central bank has stopped publishing economic indicators such
as GDP, balance of payments etc.
The country is now facing a shortage of basic necessities including food
and medicines. Venezuela's unpopular government led by Nicolas Maduro
has become even more dependent on financial deals and sale of assets to
boost its foreign exchange reserves. The Maduro government has slashed
imports of basic necessities for years to meet its bond commitments
which has spurred shortages.
Economic experts believe the only way out for Venezuela is to scrap its
price and currency control mechanisms that have crippled the private
sector. Venezuela's bonds are currently the highest-yielding among all
emerging market securities due to the high default risk attached to them.
https://fronteranews.com/news/latam/3-is-this-the-end-of-the-road-for-venezuela/
jat
2017-06-21 09:08:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Relax. Don't be excited!
Loading Image...

/jat
Knowledge will set you free
El conocimiento te hará libre
Post by PL
Post by jat
So, have fun.
I am.
I enjoy ridiculing morons like you.
Thanks for being such an idiot.
MDR
Post by jat
_
/'_/)
,/_ /
/ /
/'_'/' '/'__'7,
/'/ / / /" /_\
('( ' Fuck /' ')
\ You' /
'\' _.7'
\ (
\ \
STICK IT UP THE STICKLER!
/jat
Knowledge will set you free
El conocimiento te hará libre
Post by PL
Post by jat
Whatever you say nobody cares
You care, idiot.
As always your acts show your words are lies.
You are so entertaining.
MDR
Post by jat
Post by PL
Post by jat
You get a life as well.
I have a life and having fun
Post by jat
Sure, Internet has a long memory. And, it is also very comprehensive.
and it exposes your lies. just remember that
MDR
Post by jat
Post by PL
Post by jat
I haven't supported any politician.
Lots of your messages in support of Chavez and Castro expose you (again)
as the liar you are.
Internet has a long memory, JAT.
Face facts and get a life.
Post by jat
Post by PL
No it isn't. In fact it a a new start to recover from the Chavista
disaster. Another nail in the coffin of one of the
dictatorships you
have supported for so long, JAT.
Note that higher interest requirements means falling prices for existing
bonds.
Part of the story as usual.
Is This The End of The Road For Venezuela?
By Ridhi Khaitan -
15 Jun 2017
Rising default risk
Investors in Venezuelan debt (EMB) are undeterred by the rising
probability of a default by this embattled country. Emerging
market
fund
managers are increasingly attracted to the high yields associated with
Venezuela's high-risk bonds. Some experts, however, still believe that
Venezuela's default is coming soon. The nation recently defaulted on its
$2.5 billion loan from Russia's oil company Rosneft.
Recently, Kevin Daly, an emerging market debt specialist at Aberdeen
Asset Management, told the Financial Times that Venezuela's default is
inevitable. "But amid mounting expectation that future defaults are
inevitable as the crisis-ridden country's coffers run dry and protests
against the increasingly authoritarian government mount, some investors
now believe the strongest returns may come from longer-term paper." He
continued, "The backdrop suggests we are moving closer to a credit
event. The government is becoming more dysfunctional, the protests are
becoming more fevered and it does feel like there could be splits in the
government and military."
Falling oil prices since 2014 and mismanagement of the economy
have
led
to triple digit inflation in the troubled country and depleted its
foreign reserves.
Related Article 3 Reasons Why Venezuela May Not Default On Its Debt
Payments
Since 2013, the economy has decelerated by 27% and the IMF predicts
inflation to touch 720% this year. To further add to investor
woes,
the
country's central bank has stopped publishing economic indicators such
as GDP, balance of payments etc.
The country is now facing a shortage of basic necessities
including
food
and medicines. Venezuela's unpopular government led by Nicolas Maduro
has become even more dependent on financial deals and sale of assets to
boost its foreign exchange reserves. The Maduro government has slashed
imports of basic necessities for years to meet its bond commitments
which has spurred shortages.
Economic experts believe the only way out for Venezuela is to
scrap
its
price and currency control mechanisms that have crippled the private
sector. Venezuela's bonds are currently the highest-yielding among all
emerging market securities due to the high default risk
attached to
them.
https://fronteranews.com/news/latam/3-is-this-the-end-of-the-road-for-venezuela/
PL
2017-06-21 11:45:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by jat
Relax. Don't be excited!
Laughing at you is very relaxing.
I am super relaxed.
You are more erratic by the day.
That is fun
Post by jat
Post by PL
Post by jat
So, have fun.
I am.
I enjoy ridiculing morons like you.
Thanks for being such an idiot.
MDR
Post by jat
_
/'_/)
,/_ /
/ /
/'_'/' '/'__'7,
/'/ / / /" /_\
('( ' Fuck /' ')
\ You' /
'\' _.7'
\ (
\ \
STICK IT UP THE STICKLER!
/jat
Knowledge will set you free
El conocimiento te hará libre
Post by PL
Post by jat
Whatever you say nobody cares
You care, idiot.
As always your acts show your words are lies.
You are so entertaining.
MDR
Post by jat
Post by PL
Post by jat
You get a life as well.
I have a life and having fun
Post by jat
Sure, Internet has a long memory. And, it is also very
comprehensive.
and it exposes your lies. just remember that
MDR
Post by jat
Post by PL
Post by jat
I haven't supported any politician.
Lots of your messages in support of Chavez and Castro expose you (again)
as the liar you are.
Internet has a long memory, JAT.
Face facts and get a life.
Post by jat
Post by PL
No it isn't. In fact it a a new start to recover from the Chavista
disaster. Another nail in the coffin of one of the
dictatorships you
have supported for so long, JAT.
Note that higher interest requirements means falling prices for existing
bonds.
Part of the story as usual.
Is This The End of The Road For Venezuela?
By Ridhi Khaitan -
15 Jun 2017
Rising default risk
Investors in Venezuelan debt (EMB) are undeterred by the rising
probability of a default by this embattled country. Emerging
market
fund
managers are increasingly attracted to the high yields associated with
Venezuela's high-risk bonds. Some experts, however, still believe that
Venezuela's default is coming soon. The nation recently defaulted on its
$2.5 billion loan from Russia's oil company Rosneft.
Recently, Kevin Daly, an emerging market debt specialist at Aberdeen
Asset Management, told the Financial Times that Venezuela's default is
inevitable. "But amid mounting expectation that future defaults are
inevitable as the crisis-ridden country's coffers run dry and protests
against the increasingly authoritarian government mount, some investors
now believe the strongest returns may come from longer-term paper." He
continued, "The backdrop suggests we are moving closer to a credit
event. The government is becoming more dysfunctional, the protests are
becoming more fevered and it does feel like there could be splits in the
government and military."
Falling oil prices since 2014 and mismanagement of the economy
have
led
to triple digit inflation in the troubled country and depleted its
foreign reserves.
Related Article 3 Reasons Why Venezuela May Not Default On Its Debt
Payments
Since 2013, the economy has decelerated by 27% and the IMF predicts
inflation to touch 720% this year. To further add to investor
woes,
the
country's central bank has stopped publishing economic indicators such
as GDP, balance of payments etc.
The country is now facing a shortage of basic necessities
including
food
and medicines. Venezuela's unpopular government led by Nicolas Maduro
has become even more dependent on financial deals and sale of assets to
boost its foreign exchange reserves. The Maduro government has slashed
imports of basic necessities for years to meet its bond commitments
which has spurred shortages.
Economic experts believe the only way out for Venezuela is to
scrap
its
price and currency control mechanisms that have crippled the private
sector. Venezuela's bonds are currently the highest-yielding among all
emerging market securities due to the high default risk
attached to
them.
https://fronteranews.com/news/latam/3-is-this-the-end-of-the-road-for-venezuela/
jat
2017-06-21 02:10:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Shut the fuck up, you asshole *LAUGHTER*

/jat
Knowledge will set you free
El conocimiento te hará libre
Post by PL
Post by jat
So, have fun.
I am.
I enjoy ridiculing morons like you.
Thanks for being such an idiot.
MDR
Post by jat
_
/'_/)
,/_ /
/ /
/'_'/' '/'__'7,
/'/ / / /" /_\
('( ' Fuck /' ')
\ You' /
'\' _.7'
\ (
\ \
STICK IT UP THE STICKLER!
/jat
Knowledge will set you free
El conocimiento te hará libre
Post by PL
Post by jat
Whatever you say nobody cares
You care, idiot.
As always your acts show your words are lies.
You are so entertaining.
MDR
Post by jat
Post by PL
Post by jat
You get a life as well.
I have a life and having fun
Post by jat
Sure, Internet has a long memory. And, it is also very comprehensive.
and it exposes your lies. just remember that
MDR
Post by jat
Post by PL
Post by jat
I haven't supported any politician.
Lots of your messages in support of Chavez and Castro expose you (again)
as the liar you are.
Internet has a long memory, JAT.
Face facts and get a life.
Post by jat
Post by PL
No it isn't. In fact it a a new start to recover from the Chavista
disaster. Another nail in the coffin of one of the dictatorships you
have supported for so long, JAT.
Note that higher interest requirements means falling prices for existing
bonds.
Part of the story as usual.
Is This The End of The Road For Venezuela?
By Ridhi Khaitan -
15 Jun 2017
Rising default risk
Investors in Venezuelan debt (EMB) are undeterred by the rising
probability of a default by this embattled country. Emerging market fund
managers are increasingly attracted to the high yields associated with
Venezuela's high-risk bonds. Some experts, however, still believe that
Venezuela's default is coming soon. The nation recently defaulted on its
$2.5 billion loan from Russia's oil company Rosneft.
Recently, Kevin Daly, an emerging market debt specialist at Aberdeen
Asset Management, told the Financial Times that Venezuela's default is
inevitable. "But amid mounting expectation that future defaults are
inevitable as the crisis-ridden country's coffers run dry and protests
against the increasingly authoritarian government mount, some investors
now believe the strongest returns may come from longer-term paper." He
continued, "The backdrop suggests we are moving closer to a credit
event. The government is becoming more dysfunctional, the protests are
becoming more fevered and it does feel like there could be splits in the
government and military."
Falling oil prices since 2014 and mismanagement of the economy have led
to triple digit inflation in the troubled country and depleted its
foreign reserves.
Related Article 3 Reasons Why Venezuela May Not Default On Its Debt
Payments
Since 2013, the economy has decelerated by 27% and the IMF predicts
inflation to touch 720% this year. To further add to investor woes, the
country's central bank has stopped publishing economic indicators such
as GDP, balance of payments etc.
The country is now facing a shortage of basic necessities including food
and medicines. Venezuela's unpopular government led by Nicolas Maduro
has become even more dependent on financial deals and sale of assets to
boost its foreign exchange reserves. The Maduro government has slashed
imports of basic necessities for years to meet its bond commitments
which has spurred shortages.
Economic experts believe the only way out for Venezuela is to scrap its
price and currency control mechanisms that have crippled the private
sector. Venezuela's bonds are currently the highest-yielding among all
emerging market securities due to the high default risk attached to them.
https://fronteranews.com/news/latam/3-is-this-the-end-of-the-road-for-venezuela/
PL
2017-06-21 13:04:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by jat
Shut the fuck up, you asshole
keep making a fool of yourself by showing all what you are: a vile troll.
MDR
Post by jat
Post by PL
Post by jat
So, have fun.
I am.
I enjoy ridiculing morons like you.
Thanks for being such an idiot.
MDR
Post by jat
_
/'_/)
,/_ /
/ /
/'_'/' '/'__'7,
/'/ / / /" /_\
('( ' Fuck /' ')
\ You' /
'\' _.7'
\ (
\ \
STICK IT UP THE STICKLER!
/jat
Knowledge will set you free
El conocimiento te hará libre
Post by PL
Post by jat
Whatever you say nobody cares
You care, idiot.
As always your acts show your words are lies.
You are so entertaining.
MDR
Post by jat
Post by PL
Post by jat
You get a life as well.
I have a life and having fun
Post by jat
Sure, Internet has a long memory. And, it is also very comprehensive.
and it exposes your lies. just remember that
MDR
Post by jat
Post by PL
Post by jat
I haven't supported any politician.
Lots of your messages in support of Chavez and Castro expose you (again)
as the liar you are.
Internet has a long memory, JAT.
Face facts and get a life.
Post by jat
Post by PL
No it isn't. In fact it a a new start to recover from the Chavista
disaster. Another nail in the coffin of one of the dictatorships you
have supported for so long, JAT.
Note that higher interest requirements means falling prices for existing
bonds.
Part of the story as usual.
Is This The End of The Road For Venezuela?
By Ridhi Khaitan -
15 Jun 2017
Rising default risk
Investors in Venezuelan debt (EMB) are undeterred by the rising
probability of a default by this embattled country. Emerging market fund
managers are increasingly attracted to the high yields associated with
Venezuela's high-risk bonds. Some experts, however, still believe that
Venezuela's default is coming soon. The nation recently defaulted on its
$2.5 billion loan from Russia's oil company Rosneft.
Recently, Kevin Daly, an emerging market debt specialist at Aberdeen
Asset Management, told the Financial Times that Venezuela's default is
inevitable. "But amid mounting expectation that future defaults are
inevitable as the crisis-ridden country's coffers run dry and protests
against the increasingly authoritarian government mount, some investors
now believe the strongest returns may come from longer-term paper." He
continued, "The backdrop suggests we are moving closer to a credit
event. The government is becoming more dysfunctional, the protests are
becoming more fevered and it does feel like there could be splits in the
government and military."
Falling oil prices since 2014 and mismanagement of the economy have led
to triple digit inflation in the troubled country and depleted its
foreign reserves.
Related Article 3 Reasons Why Venezuela May Not Default On Its Debt
Payments
Since 2013, the economy has decelerated by 27% and the IMF predicts
inflation to touch 720% this year. To further add to investor woes, the
country's central bank has stopped publishing economic indicators such
as GDP, balance of payments etc.
The country is now facing a shortage of basic necessities including food
and medicines. Venezuela's unpopular government led by Nicolas Maduro
has become even more dependent on financial deals and sale of assets to
boost its foreign exchange reserves. The Maduro government has slashed
imports of basic necessities for years to meet its bond commitments
which has spurred shortages.
Economic experts believe the only way out for Venezuela is to scrap its
price and currency control mechanisms that have crippled the private
sector. Venezuela's bonds are currently the highest-yielding among all
emerging market securities due to the high default risk attached to them.
https://fronteranews.com/news/latam/3-is-this-the-end-of-the-road-for-venezuela/
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